I’ve been lucky enough to have made several trips to Mallorca, and the sheer number of fantastic snorkeling beaches the island offers always strikes me. Being fairly remote, many of these beaches have yet to be impacted by mass tourism, allowing you direct access to some of Spain’s most pristine flora and fauna. 

Snorkeling is one of my favorite things to do whenever I’m back in Mallorca. Conditions on the island are spectacular, and you can see some breathtaking marine life just meters away from the shore in many cases. In this article, I’ll break down my favorite island snorkeling beaches and provide advice for getting the most out of snorkeling in Mallorca. 

Curious about Mallorca’s neighboring island? We have a detailed comparison of Ibiza vs Mallorca.

Hi, I’m Timon!

I’ve experienced the heartbeat of Spain firsthand. Over the last five years, I’ve immersed myself in the dynamic cities of Spain, truly living the Spanish way. My insights into this beautiful country are rooted in genuine experience.

Why Mallorca is a Snorkeler’s Paradise 

There’s a reason that Mallorca is regarded as one of the best snorkeling destinations on the planet. There are several reasons; for one, the water around the island is often remarkably clear. Under the best conditions, you may have up to 30 meters of visibility – perfect for seeing as much Mallorca’s incredible marine life as possible. 

Speaking of marine life, the island is also renowned for being an absolute haven of biodiversity. You can see an incredible array of fish here, coral, anemones, squid, moray eels, dolphins, whales, octopi, and more. And, featuring abstract rock formations, underwater caves, and plenty of crevices, Mallorca’s underwater landscape pretty much beggars belief. 

Need assistance choosing the best areas to stay in Mallorca for your holiday? Our user-friendly guide identifies optimal towns and hotels for a top-notch island escapade.

1. Cala Llombards

Majorca Cala Llombards Santanyi beach in Mallorca Balearic Island of Spain
Majorca Cala Llombards Santanyi beach in Mallorca Balearic Island of Spain

Cala Llombards is a gorgeous, somewhat secluded cove beach on Mallorca’s southeastern side. The closest settlement is the nearby rustic village of Es Llombards, with Cala Llombards being roughly 10 kilometers from the town of Santanyi. 

Cala Llombards is home to pristine, white sand and crystalline, turquoise water that usually offers divers incredible visibility, arguably one of the best beaches in east Mallorca. Wheelchair access at the beach is limited, as are nearby facilities and amenities. You can expect to see a stunning array of sea anemones, coral, and cuttlefish when diving off Cala Llombards – they tend to be concentrated around the rocks found just offshore.

Additional information

  • Overall score: 8.5/10
  • Accessibility: 4/5
  • Senior friendly: Yes 
  • Child friendly: Yes 
  • Lifeguard: Yes 
  • Parking: Within 100 meters 
  • Facilities: Showers, toilets, loungers, umbrellas 
  • Restaurants: Yes 
  • Occupancy: Busy during peak season 
  • Sports: Watersports rentals 
  • Blue Flag beach

📍 See Cala Llombards on Google Maps

2. Caló des Moro

Calo Des Moro - beautiful bay of Mallorca, Spain
Calo Des Moro – beautiful bay of Mallorca, Spain

Punctuated on both sides by rugged cliffs and heath, Caló des Moro provides a dramatic and very Mallorcan backdrop to a day spent snorkeling. 

Roughly 6 kilometers away from the nearby town of Santanyi, the beach is small, and getting there can be somewhat challenging. While there is a road that leads right to the beach, signs have been put up that (erroneously) claim the road is private! 

Accessing Caló des Moro requires climbing down a fairly steep set of stairs, and no facilities or amenities are on or near the beach. You can anticipate seeing plenty of coral and pretty stunning fish in terms of marine life. 

Additional information

  • Overall score: 8/10
  • Accessibility: 3/5
  • Lifeguard: No 
  • Parking: Within 300 meters 
  • Facilities: No
  • Restaurants: No 
  • Occupancy: Busy during peak season 
  • Sports: None 

📍 See Caló des Moro on Google Maps

3. Cala Deià

Upper view of the beach Cala de Deia, Mallorca, Spain
Upper view of the beach Cala de Deia, Mallorca, Spain

The shingle beach of Cala Deià is reportedly a popular getaway amongst the many celebrities who holiday in Mallorca – and who can blame them? Sheltering at the foot of the Tramuntana Mountains, Cala is a few kilometers away from the village of Deia, home to some fantastic restaurants and charming, typical Mallorcan architecture. 

The beach does have its own dedicated parking lot, but it’s fairly small; you can also find ample parking in Deià, but you will then need to complete your journey to Cala Deia on foot. 

One of the highlights of snorkeling at Cala Deià is that you can often spot octopi. During the summer months, however, jellyfish are sighted fairly often at the beach, so I’d advise that you head here either in late spring or early autumn.

Additional information

  • Overall score: 7.8/10
  • Accessibility: 4/5
  • Lifeguard: No
  • Parking: Minimal parking nearby, otherwise available 3km away in the village of Deià 
  • Facilities: Toilets and showers
  • Restaurants: Yes 
  • Occupancy: Relatively busy during peak season 
  • Sports: None

📍 See Cala Deià on Google Maps

4. Cala Santanyí

Panoramic shot with drone from above the bay of Cala Santany in Mallorca Spain
Panoramic shot with a drone from above the bay of Cala Santanyí in Mallorca, Spain.

Cala Santanyí is one of Mallorca’s best-loved beaches and resorts and for good reason! Roughly 10 kilometers away from Santanyi, the beach at Cala Santanyi is fairly long, with calm, clear waters, perfect for snorkeling. 

It’s also one of the more built-up beaches in Mallorca, with hotels and restaurants along its length. Both showers and toilets can be found on-site, too. 

The beach can be readily accessed by car – follow the signs that lead to it from nearby Santanyí. Cala Santanyí has a paved walkway that provides wheelchair access right to the beach. 

Experience the best rental cars in Mallorca, where we cover everything from car insurance to top scenic drives.

In addition to the variety of Mediterranean marine life that can be spotted snorkeling here, Cala Santanyí is also noteworthy for its interesting rock formations, which can be spotted as you swim away from the beach and out towards the open ocean. You’ll also find a fairly secluded underwater cave to the left of the beach. 

Additional information

  • Overall score: 8.5/10
  • Accessibility: 4/5
  • Senior friendly: Yes 
  • Child friendly: Yes 
  • Lifeguard: Yes 
  • Parking: Available within 100 meters 
  • Facilities: Toilets, showers, sun loungers, umbrellas 
  • Restaurants: Yes 
  • Occupancy: Busy during peak season 
  • Sports: Water bike rental 
  • Blue Flag beach

📍 See Cala Santanyí on Google Maps

5. Dragonera Island

View from a small island of the Dragon Island
View from a small island of the Dragon Island

Dragonera Island is a picturesque island and nature reserve off the coast of Mallorca that can be accessed exclusively via boat; day trips depart from the port town of Santa Ponsa. 

Home to several rare, unique animal and plant species, including Lilford’s wall lizard and Eleonora’s falcon, Dragonera Island is also one of Mallorca’s most alluring snorkeling destinations. Just off the island’s coast, you can expect to see wildly diverse marine life, including dolphins, barracuda, and, on rare occasions, fin whales.

The island is uninhabited, so the amenities and facilities there are minimal. Most boat tours operating in the area will provide refreshments and food. 

Additional information

  • Overall score: 7.5/10
  • Accessibility: 1.5/5
  • Lifeguard: No
  • Parking: None
  • Facilities: None
  • Restaurants: None
  • Occupancy: Usually fairly quiet
  • Sports: None

📍 See Dragonera Island on Google Maps

6. Cala Agulla

Majorca Cala Agulla beach in Capdepera Mallorca at Balearic Islands of Spain
Majorca Cala Agulla beach in Capdepera Mallorca at Balearic Islands of Spain

Found in Mallorca’s northeast, Cala Agulla, one of the largest beaches on the island, is just a short distance from the neighboring resort of Cala Ratjada.

Accessible both by car and on foot, Cala Agulla features some of the cleanest, most pristine sand on Mallorca, and snorkelers can see some classic Mallorcan marine life just a short distance from the shore.

You can also rent kayaks and paddleboards on the beach, and nearby amenities include kiosks and bars. The surrounding pine forests are also a popular place to go for a walk.

Additional information

  • Overall score: 9.8/10
  • Accessibility: 5/5
  • Senior friendly: Yes
  • Child friendly: Yes
  • Lifeguard: Yes
  • Parking: Within 300 meters
  • Facilities: Toilets, sun loungers, umbrellas
  • Restaurants: Yes 
  • Occupancy: Very busy during peak season 
  • Sports: Water sports rental

📍 See Cala Agulla on Google Maps

7. Cala d’Or

Majorca Cala Dor beach in Santanyi at Balearic Islands of Spain
Majorca Cala Dor beach in Santanyi at Balearic Islands of Spain

Located on the southeastern coast of Mallorca, Cala d’Or is a resort town home to some fantastic snorkeling beaches. The charming inlet of Cala Gran is perhaps the most popular, though I’d recommend heading to Cala Esmeralda instead; thanks to the surrounding cliffs, the water is remarkably calm, creating near-perfect conditions for snorkeling. 

Cala d’Or’s beaches are all fairly easy to access, thanks to how built-up the town itself is. By the same token, they can get pretty busy in the summer – this is another area where I’d strongly suggest snorkeling outside peak hours. Nevertheless, Cala d’Or is a perfect spot for observing the many fish species that call Mallorca home, so it’s worth visiting. 

Additional information

  • Overall score: 7/10
  • Accessibility: 4/5
  • Lifeguard: No
  • Parking: Within 100 meters 
  • Facilities: Sun loungers, umbrellas 
  • Restaurants: No
  • Occupancy: Busy during peak season 
  • Sports: None

📍 See Cala d’Or on Google Maps

8. Palmanova Beach

Majorca Platja Palmanova beach in Calvia Mallorca at Balearic islands of Spain
Majorca Platja Palmanova Portonovo beach in Calvia Mallorca at Balearic islands of Spain

Believe it or not, gorgeous Palmanova Beach is just a short walk from Magaluf, Mallorca’s party capital. It’s also one of the larger beaches on the island, so it doesn’t typically get too crowded. 

Palmanova is also one of my favorite snorkeling beaches in Mallorca, thanks to the incredible coral you can see almost as soon as you hit the water. Thanks to its proximity to Magaluf, local amenities and facilities are also good.

Additional information

  • Overall score: 8.5/10
  • Accessibility: 5/5
  • Senior friendly: Yes 
  • Child friendly: Yes 
  • Lifeguard: Yes 
  • Parking: Within 300 meters 
  • Facilities: Sun loungers, umbrellas, toilets, showers
  • Restaurants: Yes 
  • Occupancy: Busy during peak season 
  • Sports: Water sports rentals

📍 See Palmanova Beach on Google Maps

9. Sa Calobra

Sa Calobra beach in Mallorca Balearic island from Spain
Sa Calobra beach in Mallorca Balearic island from Spain

Located in the Escorca region, the beach of Sa Calobra is tucked away on the northwestern coast of Mallorca. The closest settlement is a village bearing the same name, Sa Calobra, and the beach itself is noteworthy thanks to the stunning mountain vistas and rocky outcrops that flank it.

Many also regard it as one of Mallorca’s most pristine snorkeling spots; some incredible coral formations are found here. However, it’s also one of the island’s most remote and isolated beaches, and conditions at Sa Calobra are often less than ideal.

Sa Calobra can be accessed via boat or on foot (and be warned, it’s quite a trek!). Local amenities and facilities are minimal.

Additional information

  • Overall score: 7/10
  • Accessibility: 4/5
  • Lifeguard: No 
  • Parking: Within 300 meters 
  • Facilities: None 
  • Restaurants: No
  • Occupancy: Not crowded during peak season 
  • Sports: None

📍 See Sa Calobra on Google Maps

10. Cala Pi

Cala Pi bay at Mallorca, Spain
Cala Pi Bay at Mallorca, Spain

Surrounded by stunning pine forests, the beach of Cala Pi is serene and is found on Mallorca’s southern coast. It’s fairly close to Vallgornera and can be accessed by car or on foot. Diverse amenities and facilities are available here, and lifeguards are typically stationed on the beach during the summer months. 

Here, you can see a spectacularly diverse array of Mediterranean marine life. Note that making it down to the beach requires traversing a fairly steep flight of stairs; this is quite a difficult spot to access via wheelchair. 

Additional information

  • Overall score: 8/10
  • Accessibility: 3/5
  • Lifeguard: Yes 
  • Parking: Within 100 meters 
  • Facilities: None
  • Restaurants: Beach bar
  • Occupancy: Very busy during peak season 
  • Sports: No

📍 See Cala Pi on Google Maps

11. Cala Sant Vicenç

Cala de Sant Vicent beach turquoise water
Cala de Sant Vicent beach turquoise water

The quaint and civilized fishing village of Cala Sant Vincenç, home to one of North Mallorca’s best beaches, is perfect if you want to round out your snorkeling session with some of the tastiest Mallorcan food and wine the island offers. 

Cala Sant Vincenç is home to some of Mallorca’s best-regarded bars, seafood restaurants, and three gorgeous beaches; Cala Molinas, Cala Clara, and Cala Barques. All three are known for their incredibly clear water, which is ideal for snorkeling; you can see an array of fish here, including grouper, bream, and mullet, though be aware that jellyfish are sometimes spotted here in the summer. 

Facilities on the beaches are decent; paddleboard rental is also available at Cala Barques.

Additional information

  • Overall score: 9/10
  • Accessibility: 5/5
  • Senior friendly: Yes 
  • Child friendly: Yes 
  • Lifeguard: Yes 
  • Parking: Within 100 meters 
  • Facilities: Sun loungers, umbrellas, showers, toilets 
  • Restaurants: Yes 
  • Occupancy: Moderate during peak season 
  • Sports: None

📍 See Cala Sant Vicenç on Google Maps

12. Playa Delta – Maioris

Playa Delta Maioris Mallorca
Playa Delta Maioris Mallorca

Playa Delta is situated between Cala Pi and Palma, the latter of which happens to be one of Spain’s most affordable places to live and is just a stone’s throw away from the village of Maioris. Located in a serene cove, Delta is one of the lesser-known snorkeling spots in Mallorca; however, it also offers divers an incredible diversity of marine life and rock formations. 

Not only can you observe Mediterranean tape weed here, but Delta is also home to various mollusks, fish, and crustaceans. Facilities on the beach itself are somewhat limited, but there are restaurants and other eateries nearby. 

Additional information

  • Overall score: 6.5/10
  • Accessibility: 2/5
  • Lifeguard: No
  • Parking: Available at some distance 
  • Facilities: None
  • Restaurants: No
  • Occupancy: Very quiet, even during peak season 
  • Sports: No

📍 See Playa Delta – Maioris on Google Maps

13. Cala Llamp

Cala Llamp Mallorca, Spain
Cala Llamp Mallorca, Spain

In southwestern Mallorca is Cala Llamp, a cove regarded by many as being the site of one of the best beaches in south Mallorca for snorkeling. This isn’t a beach; the cove comprises a concrete walkway and natural rock formations that meet the sea.

The nearby Beach Club Gran Folies has plenty of amenities available. And the water off Cala Llamp is quite deep, making it a great place to see diverse marine wildlife.

To reach the water, descending a fairly steep set of stairs is required, and much of the cove consists of fairly uneven rocks; I’d advise against visiting Cala Llamp if you have accessibility requirements.

Additional information

  • Overall score: 8/10
  • Accessibility: 4/5
  • Lifeguard: Yes 
  • Parking: Nearby, behind the restaurant 
  • Facilities: Sun lounges, sun shades, toilets, showers
  • Restaurants: Yes 
  • Occupancy: Busy during peak season 
  • Sports: No

📍 See Cala Llamp on Google Maps

14. Cabrera Beaches

Turquoise waters in Cabrera island bay landscape. Balearic islands. Spain
Turquoise waters in Cabrera island bay landscape. Balearic islands. Spain

Another of Mallorca’s fascinating uninhabited islands is Cabrera, home to many jaw-droppingly beautiful beaches.

Snorkeling at these beaches is an opportunity to get up close and personal with loggerhead turtles, sperm whales, eels, and dolphins. The island also boasts the Museum of Cabrera and its own fairly isolated castle. Boat excursions to Cabrera depart from the resort town of Colonia de Sant Jordi.

Note that amenities and facilities on the island are fairly limited.

Additional information

  • Overall score: 7/10
  • Accessibility: 3/5
  • Lifeguard: No
  • Parking: None 
  • Facilities: None
  • Restaurants: No
  • Occupancy: Quiet during peak season 
  • Sports: No

📍 See Cabrera on Google Maps

15. Cala en Basset

Cala en Basset (Sant Elm)
Cala en Basset (Sant Elm)

Exclusively accessible via a series of nearby hiking trails or by boat, Cala en Basset is placed in a rugged, rocky bay on Mallorca’s west coast.

There are no amenities or facilities on the beach; however, as one of Mallorca’s most remote snorkeling spots, it’s also one of the most unspoiled. The water here is crystal clear, and Cala en Basset is an excellent place to see an enormous array of fish and coral species.

Additional information

  • Overall score: 7/10
  • Accessibility: 1/5
  • Lifeguard: No
  • Parking: None nearby 
  • Facilities: None
  • Restaurants: No
  • Occupancy: Quiet during peak season 
  • Sports: No

📍 See Cala en Basset on Google Maps

Snorkeling and Boat Tours Recommendations 

One of the easiest and most convenient ways to explore the waters around Mallorca is by taking one of the many excellent snorkeling or boat tours provided by local companies. Whether you’d prefer to take a dedicated snorkeling tour or one that combines both a boat ride and some diving action, I’ll provide recommendations for both in the next section. 

The Best Snorkeling Tours in Mallorca

Snorkeling in a Beautiful Nature Reserve — With a professional guide and gear hire included, this tour, which takes you snorkeling in the heart of one of Mallorca’s nature reserves, is the perfect way to experience some of the island’s most pristine marine life.

Snorkeling Tour in a Marine Reserve — Just a 10-minute boat ride from Santa Ponsa, this incredible guided snorkeling tour allows guests to see octopi, scorpionfish, and other rare sea creatures. 

Sailing with Snorkeling — This laidback tour takes you along the coast of Mallorca on a charming yacht; enjoy a glass of wine and tapas between paddleboarding and snorkeling sessions.

Private Boat Tour and Snorkeling — This private tour will take you to some of the Bay of Palma’s most secluded and pristine snorkeling spots, perfect for those wanting the convenience of a guide with an exclusive twist.

Boat Tours for Snorkeling Enthusiasts

Catamaran Cruise with Lunch & Swim — This is the perfect day out if you want to combine a relaxed cruise with snorkeling at one of Mallorca’s best spots; to top it all off, you’ll have a rustic barbecue lunch onboard.

Catamaran Cruise with Snorkeling — This cruise sees you taking in the Spanish sunshine from a luxury catamaran, snorkeling, and enjoying a barbecue and a glass of sangria onboard.

Catamaran Small Group Cruise with Tapas — A great option for those who prefer smaller group tours, this option combines delicious tapas with snorkeling and SUP boarding for an unforgettable day at sea.

Essential Tips for Snorkeling in Mallorca 

If you’re planning your trip to Mallorca but don’t have any experience snorkeling on the island, you may be wondering where to begin. In addition to the more detailed advice provided below, I suggest you thoroughly research each spot before traveling to it to get a feel for the conditions there. 

Adequate sun protection is also a must, no matter the time of year. Finally, if you’ve never been snorkeling before, you may want to consider taking an introductory session with an instructor or guide before heading out without one. 

Choosing the Right Snorkeling Gear

Snorkel equipment on a beach
Snorkel equipment on a beach

Whether you purchase or rent the snorkeling gear for your trip depends on you; if you’re not an avid snorkeler, then renting it is a great way to keep costs down. There are plenty of shops where you can rent snorkeling gear across the length and breadth of Mallorca, and their staff will usually be more than happy to provide gear advice and recommendations.

You must also try your snorkeling gear before you buy or rent it (although you might want to refrain from blowing through a bunch of different snorkels before putting them straight back on the shelves!). You’ll want to ensure your mask and flippers fit securely and comfortably; there’s nothing worse than trying to snorkel with a leaky mask, believe me. 

Best Time to Snorkel in Mallorca 

I’d generally suggest heading to Mallorca sometime between late May and early October if you plan snorkeling there. Temperatures on the island are generally more moderate than on the Spanish mainland; between November and April, for instance, they usually fall somewhere in the mid-high teens, so the water is definitely on the chilly side at this time of year. 

If you want to beat the crowds during your dive, snorkeling in the morning or early evening is often your best bet (avoiding weekends is often a good idea when possible, too). Of course, it’s also important to consider other factors here, like the weather and conditions, and whether the tide is high or low enough for the dive spot you plan on visiting. 

Consider renting a boat in Mallorca to explore snorkeling spots on your own.

Respecting Marine Life and the Environment 

Poseidon Mallorca specializes in private tours to Mallorca’s nature reserves and more remote areas; tapas and refreshments are also provided. 

Another great tour to discover a spectacular paradise is the Marine Reserve Kayak Tour from Santa Ponsa towards the Malgrats Islands marine reserve. On this trip, you’ll see cool caves, walk on a small beach, and check out a natural pool. You can swim in the clear water and take a break. After that, it’s time to head back to the mainland, all without using any fuel!

Safety Precautions and Responsible Snorkeling Practices 

While snorkeling is generally a low-risk activity, there are several safety precautions you should always take to minimize the risk of accidents or injury to yourself and others. First and foremost, make sure to go with a buddy! Whether it’s a friend, partner, or someone you just met, diving with someone else is crucial in keeping you safe; you’ll ideally want to stick fairly close to one another, too. 

If you’re heading out without a tour operator, you’ll also want to check the weather forecast before you depart to ensure the conditions will be safe for you to snorkel in. 

There are also ways to limit any environmental impact your snorkeling trip to Mallorca might have. 

Heading out with one of the eco-friendly tour operators we’ve recommended is a great start; you’ll also want to be careful not to stand on or touch any animals or coral while diving, as this can damage the fragile local ecosystem. 

It’s also worth noting that some animals, like turtles and dolphins, are protected species in Mallorca, so you’ll want to give them an extensive berth. And, while it may seem tempting, please don’t feed the fish!  

Respecting and taking the best possible care of Mallorca’s incredible marine life is vital to ensure that future generations can enjoy it, just as we have. I strongly encourage you to follow the tips outlined here to help minimize your impact on the local environment and any others you might encounter during your stay.

Conclusion: Embrace the Beauty of Mallorca’s Snorkeling Beaches 

I can’t think of a better place for snorkeling than Mallorca, even if you’ve never worn a pair of flippers. Conditions are generally fantastic, the visibility is, for the most part, very impressive, and you’ll be able to explore the incredible array of biodiversity hidden right beneath the waves. In fact, swimming is renowned as one of the beloved activities across Spain’s popular sports and recreational activities.

In this article, I’ve covered some of the best snorkeling beaches in Mallorca and provided a range of handy tips to help you get the most out of your trip. So, what are you waiting for? 

If you’re interested in exploring more about Mallorca, make sure to visit Valldemossa, a cute village on the island of Mallorca.

Just letting you know
When you buy something through my links, I’ll earn a small commission—don’t worry, it won’t cost you any extra! It’s a win-win, right?